South Dakota Statewide Family Engagement Center

Home learning resources, and strategies to connect schools, families and communities.

You do not have to be a South Dakota resident to take advantage of this great website to support early learners. The South Dakota Statewide Family Engagement Center (SD SFEC) has partnered with other education agencies to create early learning kits.  For South Dakota friends (teachers, families, and childcare providers) you can request early learning kits for young children. However, for non- South Dakota residents there are 24 Kindergarten Readiness cards that can be downloaded on its website. 

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

 

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Kindergarten Behaviors to Start School

Kindergarten readiness starts at home.

It’s funny the things you think of at big moments in your life.  I remember very clearly what I was thinking my first day as a K-5 principal when I went out to meet the children.  As they enthusiastically came off the buses, I’m sure none of them knew that their new principal was thinking “ready or not, here they come”.  They arrived and although I questioned myself many times over that year, I finally came to terms with my readiness.

For years, future kindergarten parents have questioned whether their child “would be, is, or was” ready for kindergarten.   The typical flightiness of 5-year olds, gives some parents cause for sleepless nights. 

Parents often try to get a head start on academics with their preschooler.  However, if you ask a group of kindergarten teachers what skills are the best predictors of success in kindergarten, the answer may surprise you. Although I had taught Kindergarten, it was when I became the principal of a K-2 school that I REALLY saw these behaviors ring true. 

Kindergarten Behaviors to be “Ready to Learn” (alphabetical order) 

  • adapts easily to change
  • follows classroom rules
  • learns independently
  • organizes belongings
  • pays attention
  • persists in completing tasks
  • shows eagerness to learn

Kids, like adults, are imperfect.  So when looking at your future kindergarten students, think “big picture” when looking at the traits.  Think how your child does overall with those characteristics.  If you see an area, that they need additional support, try to find opportunities to practice these skills at home over the next few months.  

As a kindergarten teacher, various readiness levels are a “given” in a classroom.  Sharing your concerns and working together with your child’s teacher will help support your child’s success. 

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Readiness and Kindergarten Screening

Is your child ready for kindergarten. Check out a list of readiness skills.

Ready or not for Kindergarten
Readiness for Kindergarten is learned over time.

I’ve been struggling to write this post for some time. My struggle has been how to balance giving parents information about readiness skills without causing fear about Kindergarten Screening. So, to get in front of this, this post is meant to be a simple check up to see how your child is progressing.  All the skills below can be learned by spending time with your child doing activities and are learned over time. Many of them can be done through simple play.  

As a principal of a primary school I’ve talked to many parents about their child’s kindergarten screening results.   Kindergarten screening tools are intended to see if your child is “ready” for kindergarten.  In other words, is your child socially, emotionally and academically “ready to learn”.  For some parents their goal is to “ace the kindergarten screening”.  For those parents I give them 100% on enthusiasm.  However, please remember that children develop at different rates and perfection on kindergarten screening should NOT be the goal.  Real results help teachers plan appropriate programming for your child.

It’s important to remember that kindergarten screening results give an overview of how a child performed on “that particular test, on that particular day”. Therefore, it may not be an 100% accurate on your child’s abilities. It is for this reason that your child’s kindergarten screening SHOULD NOT be the only thing that a school looks at when assessing your child’s school readiness. Your knowledge along with preschool teacher evaluations are also important.  Although your child’s school may have done thousands of screenings, they have only done 1 screening on your child. Don’t be shy to share your observations about your child with the school.

Kindergarten Ready or Not?

So, if you are wondering if your child is ready for kindergarten take a look at the list below. The items below help you to look at your 4 or 5 year old’s physical, social, emotional and academic development.

You may find that some younger kids can do some of the items on the list. That is perfectly fine since learning occurs over time. However, the list, in its entirety is not intended to be used for children younger than three. For my enthusiastic friends, consider it as “Coming Attractions”.

Readiness: Letters and Words

  • Identifies and names at least 10 letters of the alphabet.
  • Matches a letter with the beginning sound of a word: for example, matches the letter “h” with a picture of a house.
  • Recognizes rhyming words such as mouse and house.
  • Begins to write some of the letters in his or her own first name.
  • Recognizes his or her own first name in print and some of the letters.
  • Understands words such as top, bottom, big, little.
  • Identifies words or signs he or she sees often, for example: McDonalds, Wal-Mart, stop signs.
  • Draws pictures to express ideas and tell stories.
  • Can recognize and name at least five colors.    

Readiness and Speaking

  • Answers simple questions: who, what, when, where?
  • Shares and talks about his/her own experiences in a way that can be understood by most listeners.
  • Follows directions with at least two steps, for example: “Pick up the book and put it on the shelf, please.”
  • Initiates and joins in conversations with adults and children.
  • Asks questions about how things work in the world around him, for example: “Why do babies cry?”
  • Says and/or sings familiar nursery rhymes.    

Book Readiness

  • Shows growing interest in reading and being read to.
  • Holds and looks at books correctly: for example, holds the book right side up and turns the pages one at a time from front to back.
  • Tells a story from the picture on the cover or in the book.    
  • Retells a simple story after listening to it while looking at the pictures in the book.
  • Makes simple predictions and comments about a story being read.      

Math Readiness (Numbers and Shapes)

  • Recognizes and names 4 shapes: circle, square, rectangle and triangle.
  • Counts out loud from 1 to 10 in correct order.
  • Identifies written numbers from one to ten.  
  • Puts written numerals in order from 1 to 10: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.
  • Counts at least 5 objects such as 5 pennies.     
  • Sees the numeral 3 and understands this means 3 objects, such as 3 cookies.    
  • Adds and subtracts familiar objects such as stickers.  
  • Uses familiar objects, such as chips, to show concepts of more and less.    
  • Draws a line, circle, rectangle, triangle, X and + .

Same, Different and Patterns

  • Matches two pictures that are alike.  
  • Looks at groups of objects and says which are the same shape, color or size.  
  • Tells things that go together, for example: a spoon and fork are for eating and a fish and a boat go in the water.
  • Repeats a pattern you start, for example: blue, blue, green – blue, blue, green.   
  • Puts three pictures in order, for example: 1. Child puts on boots 2. Child point to a puddle 3. Child jumps in puddle while laughing.

Growing Up: Are They Ready?

  • Takes care of own needs such as toileting, washing hands, dressing and trying to tie his or her own shoes.  
  • Tells full name, address and telephone number.
  • Uses pencils, crayons and markers for drawing and writing.
  • Cuts safely with scissors.
  • Tells if he or she is a boy or a girl.
  • Tells how old he or she is.
  • Adjusts to new situations without parents being there.
  • Runs, jumps, hops, throws, catches and bounces a ball.
  • Rides a tricycle.
  • Goes up and down stairs using both feet (Left, Right, Left)
  • Attempts and completes tasks, understands it’s okay to make mistakes.  
  • Remembers to say “please” and “thank you”.
  • Resolves conflicts with playmates and others appropriately.
  • Responds appropriately to his feelings and the feelings of others.
  • Uses words to express feelings, “I’m angry”, “I’m sad”.  
  • Takes turns, shares and plays with other children.
  • Initiates positive interaction with peers.  
  • Puts puzzles together.

Health & Safety Readiness

  • Asks for adult help when needed.  
  • Follows a set routine and schedule for preparing for bed, personal hygiene and eating meals. 
  • Uses good habits, for example uses a spoon to eat, closed mouth when chewing, covers nose and mouth to sneeze and washes hands after using the toilet and before eating.  
  • Is aware of and follows simple safety rules.  
  • Recognizes potentially dangerous or harmful objects, substances, situations and activities.  
  • Participates in vigorous physical activity daily.
  • Remember that your child will grow tremendously in kindergarten.

Take some time to enjoy the journey!

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

DayByDayNY: Kindergarten Readiness Calendar

DayByDayNY Family Literacy Calendar is an early literacy calendar that features daily activities to foster kindergarten readiness skills.

DayByDayNY Family Literacy Calendar is an early literacy calendar that features daily activities to foster kindergarten readiness skills.
Daily Calendar to support Kindergarten Readiness

DayByDayNY Family Literacy Calendar is a great resource for young kids. Parents or guardians in ANY state or ANY country will find information to help their children learn. Great resource. Take a look!

DayByDayNY Family Literacy Calendar is an early literacy calendar developed by the New York State Library Association. The calendar features daily activities to foster kindergarten readiness skills. It also contains wellness information and resources to encourage daily reading.

The homepage is updated daily and includes songs, videos, crafts and an eBook that reads the text aloud. The pages can even be set to turn automatically. Parents can download the One More Story app to have it available on their mobile devices too. Daily links also include health and literacy information.  

If families spend a few minutes together a day on these activities your time will be well spent. However, if you still aren’t sure if it’s worth a look check out the DayByDayNY link.

Please share this site with others.  They will Thank you for it!

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Hello Kindergarten: Great Resource

Kindergarten transition is important.
Kindergarten transition is important.

Two more of grandkids are going to Kindergarten in September. While we are all enjoying our summer, fitting in some academics can easily be done with the Hello Kindergarten toolkit. For those parents looking for a good resource the Hello Kindergarten toolkit is a great online option.

The toolkit contains a variety of resources to help families through kindergarten transition. The resource was developed by a partnership between the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood and the Connecticut State Department of Education.  Although it was developed for Connecticut families, this is an excellent resource for ALL families looking to support their “soon to be” Kindergartener. 

The toolkit includes multiple topics on transition such as: 

  • What your child should know and be able to do before her/she goes off to school,
  • How to give your child a healthy start, and
  • How the registration process works.

Even if you think your child is ready for Kindergarten; it certainly is worth a look.  Enjoy this special time with your child!

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Books Before Kindergarten: 1000?

Reading to kids is important. Try setting 1000 books before kindergarten and get reading.

Is  reading to young children important to you?  If your answer is YES!, perhaps the 1000 Books Before Kindergarten Program is a good goal for parents and preschool teachers. 

Research shows that as many as one in five children have trouble learning to read. As a result, reading has been linked to academic success. Unfortunately, formal school does not usually start until ages 5-6.  Therefore, parents and preschool teachers take on the important role of being first teachers to children. The 1000 Books Before Kindergarten challenges parents and preschool teachers to read 1000 books to young children before they enter Kindergarten.

Take a look: https://1000booksbeforekindergarten.org/

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Strategies to Help Kids Organization

Organization is key for student success.

Working with teachers for over 30 years, I have learned many strategies to try to help students be successful. Some worked and some did not. Since all students learn differently it is important that teachers build a “strategies toolkit” to be ready for each child who enters their classroom door. 

What Are Academic Intervention Strategies (AIS)?

When a student is having difficulty learning a teacher must try a variety of ways to help them be more successful. As adults we all learn things differently and kids are no different. An advantage of an extensive “strategies toolkit” is that many kids can benefit from the special strategies in day-to-day learning. The Individuals with Disabilities, Education Improvement Act (IDEA) supports interventions and requires teachers to identify strategies implemented and their outcomes prior to special education services being approved.  

Organization Strategies

  • Provide structure and consistency by establishing a daily routine.
  • Use a timer.
  • Reduce distractions.
  • Reward small successes
  • Teach unspoken social rules.
  • Give clear, specific directions.
  • Provide assignment notebook.
  • Help student keep daily & weekly goals list.
  • Help students keep materials in a specific place.
  • Preferential seating, make sure student can see you.
  • Give extra time.
  • Give “warnings” or “reminders” of deadlines.
  • Direct teach organizational skills every day.
  • Model organization and point out how YOU keep yourself organized.
  • Consistency is key for kids organization.

Using specific Academic Intervention Strategies can sometimes prevent the need to refer a student for additional support programs or Special Education services. Knowing the best way to reach individual students can make a big difference in a child’s educational career.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Academic Intervention Strategies: Handwriting

Academic Intervention Strategies can help kids with handwriting.

Working with teachers for over 30 years, I have learned many strategies to try to help students be successful. Since all students learn differently it is important that teachers build a “strategies toolkit” to be ready for each child who enters their classroom door. 

One area that is often overlooked in the “age of word processing” is handwriting. However, not all kids will have computers 24/7 so a child’s handwriting must be legible so teachers can assess student learning accurately.

What Are Academic Intervention Strategies (AIS)?

When a student is having difficulty learning a teacher must try a variety of ways to help them be more successful. As adults we all learn things differently and kids are no different. An advantage of an extensive “strategies toolkit” is that many kids can benefit from the special strategies in day-to-day learning. The Individuals with Disabilities, Education Improvement Act (IDEA) supports interventions and requires teachers to identify strategies implemented and their outcomes prior to special education services being approved. 

Academic Intervention Services: Handwriting

  • Ask the school nurse to check student vision.
  • Reward quality.
  • Remind students often and consistently of using good penmanship.
  • Clearly explain what is acceptable to you.
  • Allow students to use paper with their choice of line width.
  • Directly teach letter positioning, directions & spacing.
  • Provide a handwriting model.
  • Allow pencil grips.  Try different types.
  • Reinforce an honest effort.
  • Shorten written tasks.
  • Allow extra time to complete tasks.
  • Use tape to keep paper positioned.
  • Try different sized pencils. (Golf pencils (shorter) allow a better grip)
  • Teach correct pencil grip & proper writing position.
  • Give students a visual reminder of where to start and end.

Using specific Academic Intervention Strategies can sometimes prevent the need to refer a student for additional support programs or Special Education services. Knowing the best way to reach individual students can make a big difference in a child’s educational career.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Math Intervention Strategies

Math Intervention Strategies can help all kids learn.

Working with teachers for over 30 years, I have learned many strategies to try to help students be successful. Since all students learn differently it is important that teachers build a “strategies toolkit” to be ready for each child who enters their classroom door. Math Intervention Strategies can help those students who struggle in Math. 

What Are Academic Intervention Strategies (AIS)?

When a student is having difficulty learning a teacher must try different Academic Intervention Strategies to help them be more successful. As adults we all learn things differently and kids are no different. An advantage of an extensive “strategies toolkit” is that many kids can benefit from the special strategies in day-to-day learning. The Individuals with Disabilities, Education Improvement Act (IDEA) supports interventions and requires teachers to identify strategies implemented and their outcomes prior to special education services being approved. 

Math Intervention Strategies

  • Identify the specific problem and remediate that particular skill.
  • Help students over over-learn facts.
  • Regularly review words/phrases that indicate the correct operation to use.
  • Provide peer tutor.
  • Provide calculator.
  • Have student check all math answers.
  • Remind students “Math is important”.
  • Use manipulatives.
  • Allow math facts reference sheet.
  • Present directions clearly using multiple modalities.
  • Teach students to look for clues in word problems.

Using specific Math Intervention Strategies can sometimes prevent the need to refer a student for additional support programs or Special Education services. Knowing the best way to reach individual students can make a big difference in a child’s educational career.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Academic Intervention Strategies: Reading

Academic Intervention Strategies help all kids learn

Working with teachers for over 30 years, I have learned many strategies to try to help students be successful. Some worked and some did not. Since all students learn differently it is important that teachers build a “strategies toolkit” to be ready for each child who enters their classroom door. 

What Are Academic Intervention Strategies (AIS)?

When a student is having difficulty learning a teacher must try a variety of ways to help them be more successful. As adults we all learn things differently and kids are no different. An advantage of an extensive “strategies toolkit” is that many kids can benefit from the special strategies in day-to-day learning. The Individuals with Disabilities, Education Improvement Act (IDEA) supports interventions and requires teachers to identify strategies implemented and their outcomes prior to special education services being approved.  

Academic Intervention Strategies: Reading Words

  • Ask the school nurse to check vision, hearing and tracking.
  • Ask parents about developmental and family history.
  • Identify the specific skill weaknesses and provide tutoring.
  • Provide interesting easy-reading materials.
  • Reinforce and reteach phonics rules daily.
  • Conference with administrator to share student progress and inquire about additional resources available.
  • Provide daily silent reading opportunities.
  • Provide peer tutor.
  • Reward successes.
  • Provide word bank. Review and reinforce OFTEN.

Academic Intervention Strategies: Reading Comprehension

  • Check student file to see if student is in ESL, AIS, Special Education, has a 504 or is in another specialized program.
  • Check to see if modifications have been assigned.  
  • Teach students to read questions before reading passage.
  • Teach highlighting and underlining.
  • Emphasize major points with voice, print and mannerisms.
  • Read with student.
  • Break up passage into shorter segments.
  • Assign reading at the child’s reading level to build mastery.
  • Ask questions that involve critical thinking.
  • Teach students to ask – wh- questions (who, what, when, where, and why)
  • Let students “shadow read” – read along with a stronger reader.
  • Model reading throughout the day.

Using specific Academic Intervention Strategies can sometimes prevent the need to refer a student for additional support programs or Special Education services. Knowing the best way to reach individual students can make a big difference in a child’s educational career.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Summer Jokes Are Fun!

Summer Jokes for FUN!

It is summer and time for some Summer Jokes!  After the last 15 months I think we all deserve some time to laugh and enjoy life.  It’s time for fun and relaxation. Check out the jokes below that are simple, silly and will give you some summertime FUN!

Happy Summer!

19 Summer Jokes

  1. Why do bananas use sunscreen?
  2. Which letter is the coolest?
  3. What do you call a snowman in July?
  4. What race is never run?
  5. What is the best day to go to the beach?
  6. What does the sun drink out of?
  7. What do you get when you combine an elephant with a fish?
  8. What do you pay to spend a day on the beach?
  9. Why are mountains the funniest place to vacation?
  10. What do frogs eat in the summer?
  11. Do fish go on vacation?
  12. What do you call seagulls that live near the bay?
  13. What happens if you throw a red sun hat in the water?
  14. Why does a seagull fly over the sea?
  15. What kind of water cannot freeze?
  16. What kind of tree fits in your hand?
  17. What animal is always at a baseball game?
  18. Why are fish never good tennis players?
  19. Where do sheep go on vacation?

Summer Joke Answers

  1. Because they peel.
  2. Iced t.
  3. A puddle.
  4. A swimming race.
  5. SUNday.
  6. Sunglasses.
  7. A: Swimming trunks!    
  8. Sand dollars. 
  9. They are hill-arious. 
  10. Hopsicles! 
  11. No, because they are always in school!
  12. Bagels. 
  13. It gets wet! 
  14. Because if it flew over the bay, it would be a baygull.
  15. Hot water.
  16. A palm tree!
  17. A bat
  18. Because they never get close to the net!
  19. To the baa-hamas!

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Father’s Day Jokes 2021

Father’s Day jokes will make everyone smile.

I am loving being the Grandma on Father’s Day because I can help the grandkids prepare something for their DADs for the special day.  For the little ones, we tackled a card. But for the older ones…. we went for Father’s Day jokes. Teaching vocabulary, explaining the puns, and helping them “deliver” the jokes was hysterical. But watching some of the kids crack up with laughter and the others rolling their eyes, just made my day. 

So, to my sons and son-in-law, I hope you enjoy the kids presents as much as I did helping them get ready.  

Happy Father’s Day Friends! 

10 Father’s Day Jokes

  1. What did the golfer dad want for Father’s Day?
  2. What do dads like to snack on for Father’s Day?
  3. When does Father’s Day come before St. Patrick’s Day?
  4. Why did the kids give their dad a blanket for Father’s Day?
  5. What is the last thing the balloon said to his dad on Father’s Day?
  6. What is the easiest kind of flower to find for dad on Father’s Day?
  7. What do dads like to eat for breakfast on Father’s Day?
  8. How do dads look on Father’s Day?
  9. What kind of music did the kids play for their dad on Father’s Day?
  10. What is the first thing a dad does on Father’s Day?

Answers

  1. A Tee Shirt
  2. POPcorn.
  3. In the dictionary!
  4. Because he was the coolest dad.
  5. POP!
  6. Daddylions.
  7. POP Tarts!
  8. With their eyes.
  9. Pop music.
  10. He wakes up!

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.


Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Summer Travel Car Games

Summer Travel Car Games

Summer travel with kids can be a challenge for parents and grandparents. Whether it is a 10-minute ride to do a quick errand or 10-hour road trip, keeping everyone “boredom free” is not always easy. Check out 5 games to try on your next car trip and see the miles fly by. They might even make getting there FUN! 

Summer Travel Games

  1. Add Them Up! – Each player chooses a license plate they see and writes the numbers down. Each player adds the numbers and gets a total.  The player with the highest total wins 1 point. The first player to get 10 points wins. Variations: Change the total number of points to win. Set a time (phone timer works well) for players to find the “best” license plate to use in the game.
  2. License Plate Words – Each player chooses a license plate that has at least three letters. Write the 3 letters down and try to make a word using all 3 letters. The player that makes the word first wins 1 point. The first player to get 10 points wins. Variations: Someone else chooses the license plate and each player tries to make a word using the same letters. Each player tries to make as many words as possible using the 3 letters in a given amount of time and gets 1 point for each word created. The total number of points to win can be adjusted as needed.
  3. License Plate Phrases – A variation from License Plate Words, Phrases challenges plyers to try to make up a phrase or sentence with the initials for the license plate in the same order.  “PGM” could become “Penny Grows Marigolds”. Variations: Choose 3 license plates with letters and make 3 different sentences to tell a story.  This idea can be adjusted to different number of sentences and can be done individually or as a group.
  4. License Plate State Race – Each player tries to find a license plate from different states.  With no preparation, kids can write down the name of the state they found.  With preparation, a list of all the states can be used and they can be checked off.  To make the list reusable, put the list in a page protector on a clipboard and give your child a highlighter to mark off the states as they are discovered. A number can be determined to name a winner, or a winner can be named after a set time limit. Variations: Count the license plates by the background color.  Set a number of each color to win the game. Check off the state by finding the license plate by the state motto.  For younger kids, the prep is a list of state names with the state motto.  Older kids can use a list of state mottos ONLY.
  5. License Plate Alphabet – The object of the game is to find every letter of the alphabet, in order, on license plates. Each player watches license plates and calls out the letters (big letters only) as she sees them. Letters must be called in alphabetical order and players can find more than one letter on a license plate. Completing the alphabet is the reward if it is a group game.  IF you have a competitive group, the winner can be the person who completes the alphabet by finding the letter Z.

I am ready for the 12-hour trip to the beach.  Bring it on girls!

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Literacy-Rich Classroom Environments

Literacy-rich classrooms support student learning.

When working with student teachers, I am often asked what things I see in a classroom that makes it a literacy-rich environment. A literacy-rich environment emphasizes the importance of speaking, reading, and writing. It is designed to facilitate language and literacy opportunities. It should surround our students with literacy that expands outside the subject of reading and into all subject areas.

The specific design classroom is dependent on the age of the students.  The following factors can be used as is or modified to meet your student needs. Check them out and see how literacy -rich your classroom is.

Literacy-Rich Classroom Characteristics:

  • Walls that reinforce and grow with students.
  • High engagement literacy activities
  • Heavy focus on application through authentic texts
  • Classroom library with a variety of independent texts
  • Leveled literacy library for small group instruction.
  • Meaningful independent seatwork with a purpose
  • Classroom displays that document learning in progress.
  • Learning resources to support knowledge (word walls, anchor charts)
  • Interdisciplinary viewpoint
  • Literacy centers that reinforce and extend learning.
  • Appropriate homework to apply and practice learning.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Stories and Jokes with Holes

Stories and Jokes with Holes

When you give stories and jokes with holes to your kids you have to teach them to look at them differently.  Teaching them that the nonsense or confusing language they are reading is part of “the trick” will help them to find solutions.

Guide them to look for a word or a phrase that may have more than one meaning.  Check that they understand what the question is asking. Encourage them to reread the story and the question aloud SLOWLY, thinking about each word.  Just knowing that these are “tricky” will help them get in a mindset to figure out the answer.  

Need a little help to get you thinking? Check out the hints listed below.  

Stories and Jokes with Holes Challenges

  1. What has a large mouth but cannot talk?
  2. What 3 syllable word contains all twenty-six letters
  3. What has cities without people, rivers with no water, and forests without trees?
  4. How long would it take someone to cut a log into ten pieces if each cut takes one minute?
  5. Emily bragged about her softball team.  “Three of our ladies hit home runs, and two of those were grand slams.  We won but not a single lady crossed the plate.” How is this possible?
  6. The car salesperson was selling lots of cars last week.  Each day she sold 5 more cars than she did the day before.  How many cars did she sell on the first day? How many cars did she sell at the end of the entire week?
  7. Two teenagers traveled to Tennessee to talk to the governor about voter’s rights.  How many T’s are in that?
  8. What question can you never answer “yes” to?

Answers

  1. A jar
  2. Alphabet
  3. A map
  4. 9 minutes- it only takes 9 cuts. 
  5. All of the players were married.
  6. On the 1st day, she sold 0, 2nd day -5, 3rd day – 10, 4th day 15, 5th day 20, 6th day 25, 7th day 30.  At the end of the first day, she did not sell any cars. Total cars sold in a week was 105.
  7. There are only two T’s in the word THAT.
  8. Are you asleep?

Stories and Jokes with Holes Hints

  1. HINT:  It is an item that can be found in a refrigerator or a cupboard.  
  2. It is a word that many kids learn about in preschool.
  3. HINT: It can help you find your way.
  4. HINT: Try using a chart to solve the problem and include how many pieces are cut each minute.
  5. HINT:  The two words “single lady” is key to the answer.
  6. HINT: Try using a chart to solve the problem and include how many cars are sold each day. 
  7. HINT: Focus only on the question and NOT on the story.
  8. It is something that everyone does every day (usually at nighttime)

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

National Park Service: Virtual Resource

National Park Service has outstanding virtual resources.

The United States has 62 officially protected areas designated as national parks. Since they are spread across the country, most of us can’t get to visit a park easily.  Lucky for us, the National Park Service (NPS) has created an extensive list of digital opportunities and activities to do at home or at school. The resources are good for all ages and can be integrated into all content areas and subject areas. 

Virtual visitors can access live tours, kid’s activities, reading lists, digital suggestions and participate in live presentations. There are also online galleries of photos, videos, webcams, podcasts, and sound recordings. They also have made it easy to connect 24/7 to their websites and through social media.  You can share stories, photos, trip ideas. Park experiences, and more with park staff and other enthusiasts.  Many parks and programs have their own account to follow but you can also follow national NPS accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

National Park Service (NPS) Social Media

  • Facebook: Receive updates, news releases, photos, videos, events, and live streams from parks and NPS programs.
  • Instagram: Get your daily inspiration of photos, videos, and live stories from parks around the country.
  • Twitter: Receive park updates, news releases, photos, and videos from @NatlParkService.
  • YouTube: Explore videos about wildlife, history, events, trip planning, and more.

My Favorite Virtual National Parks

National Park Service (NPS) Activities

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Calendar Dates for June/July

June/July FUN Activities

Just because kids aren’t in school doesn’t mean you don’t celebrate special dates.  Calendar dates can help to make days special and opportunities to learn. Special days and observances can be everything from silly to serious and everything in between.

I know I have NOT included every celebration in the list below.  But the list below should get you started with some “hours of fun!”  ENJOY! 

June Daily Calendar Dates

  • June 3: World Bicycle Day
  • June 5: National Doughnut Day (first Friday)
  • June 8: World Ocean Day
  • June 10: Iced Tea Day
  • June 19: Juneteenth
  • June 20: Summer Solstice/Summer Begins (varies)
  • June 21: Father’s Day (third Sunday)

June Weekly/Monthly Calendar Dates

  • Teacher Thank You Week (first week)
  • National Gardening Week (first week)
  • National Flag Week (usually third week with Flag Day)
  • Dairy Month

July Daily Holidays and Observances

July 4: Independence Day

  • July 4: Independence Day
  • July 18: World Listening Day
  • July 19: National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday)
  • July 23: Gorgeous Grandma Day
  • July 26: National Parents Day (fourth Sunday)
  • July 30: International Day of Friendship

July Weekly/Monthly Holidays and Observances

  • Clean Beaches Week (July 1-7)
  • National Ice Cream Month
  • National Make a Difference for Children Month
  • National Picnic Month

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Google Earth: Home Learning

Google Earth is great for home learning.

So, in looking for additional things to do with my granddaughters on virtual school days, I started exploring Google Earth. Google Earth is a learning tool to experience new places and adventures around the world without leaving your home. It is one of the easiest distance learning resources requiring little prep and the kids love it; almost as much as I do. Without travel this year, it has become our virtual “staycation”.

Kids Favorite Google Earth Activities:

  • Voyager Games and Activities – A collection of interactive guided tours, quizzes and layers that uses rich media, 360 videos, and street views that allow you to see the world. Kids can explore National Parks, track hurricanes, and explore space. They can even play travel games using Carmen Sandiego and discover new places, cultures, and customs. 
  • I’m Feeling Lucky button – As a kid, I would spin the globe and see where my finger landed.  I had read the name, but I never researched anything about where my finger landed.  Now, with a simple “click” you can stop the globe from spinning and learn about the place where the globe stopped. 

Be sure to check out the Resource Hub on the Google Earth Education website. It has amazing resources for teachers that are READY to GO.  Complete lesson plans are available on multiple topics and on many grade levels. The site, complete with tutorials, makes learning fun and easy.  There are also opportunities to join global projects with other classrooms and publish student writing.   This site is a win-win for everyone! Have Fun!

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

  • Virtual Aquariums Are Fun
  • Historical Landmarks Virtual Tours

June Dates for Classroom FUN

June Dates for Classroom FUN

June dates are sure to bring lots of fun to classrooms. Calendar dates can help to make days special and opportunities to learn. Special days and observances can be everything from silly to serious and everything in between.

These special days don’t have to be only celebrated at home.  Knowing the days can extend to homes and family activities too.  Aren’t we all looking for ways to make learning at fun everywhere?  After a year of being in the midst of a pandemic aren’t we all ready for some FUN?  

I know I have NOT included every celebration in the list below.  But the list below should get you started with some “hours of fun!”  ENJOY! If you are ready for even more fun, check out the websites below that list additional holidays and celebrations.  Along with basic information you will find classroom resources and lesson ideas.  ALL FREE!

June Dates: Daily Celebrations

  • June 4                  National Donut Day
  • June 8                  World Ocean Day
  • June 14                Flag Day
  • June 18                International Picnic Day
  • June 18                National Flip Flop Day
  • June 19                Juneteenth
  • June 20                Start of Summer
  • June 20                Father’s Day
  • June 21                World Music Day
  • June 27                National Sunglasses Day

June Weekly Observances

  • Teacher Thank You Week (1st week)

June Monthly Observances

  • National Safety Month
  • Child Vision Awareness Month
  • National Safety Month

FREE Celebration Resources

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic: