Math Intervention Strategies

Math Intervention Strategies can help all kids learn.

Working with teachers for over 30 years, I have learned many strategies to try to help students be successful. Since all students learn differently it is important that teachers build a “strategies toolkit” to be ready for each child who enters their classroom door. Math Intervention Strategies can help those students who struggle in Math. 

What Are Academic Intervention Strategies (AIS)?

When a student is having difficulty learning a teacher must try different Academic Intervention Strategies to help them be more successful. As adults we all learn things differently and kids are no different. An advantage of an extensive “strategies toolkit” is that many kids can benefit from the special strategies in day-to-day learning. The Individuals with Disabilities, Education Improvement Act (IDEA) supports interventions and requires teachers to identify strategies implemented and their outcomes prior to special education services being approved. 

Math Intervention Strategies

  • Identify the specific problem and remediate that particular skill.
  • Help students over over-learn facts.
  • Regularly review words/phrases that indicate the correct operation to use.
  • Provide peer tutor.
  • Provide calculator.
  • Have student check all math answers.
  • Remind students “Math is important”.
  • Use manipulatives.
  • Allow math facts reference sheet.
  • Present directions clearly using multiple modalities.
  • Teach students to look for clues in word problems.

Using specific Math Intervention Strategies can sometimes prevent the need to refer a student for additional support programs or Special Education services. Knowing the best way to reach individual students can make a big difference in a child’s educational career.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Calendar Dates for June/July

June/July FUN Activities

Just because kids aren’t in school doesn’t mean you don’t celebrate special dates.  Calendar dates can help to make days special and opportunities to learn. Special days and observances can be everything from silly to serious and everything in between.

I know I have NOT included every celebration in the list below.  But the list below should get you started with some “hours of fun!”  ENJOY! 

June Daily Calendar Dates

  • June 3: World Bicycle Day
  • June 5: National Doughnut Day (first Friday)
  • June 8: World Ocean Day
  • June 10: Iced Tea Day
  • June 19: Juneteenth
  • June 20: Summer Solstice/Summer Begins (varies)
  • June 21: Father’s Day (third Sunday)

June Weekly/Monthly Calendar Dates

  • Teacher Thank You Week (first week)
  • National Gardening Week (first week)
  • National Flag Week (usually third week with Flag Day)
  • Dairy Month

July Daily Holidays and Observances

July 4: Independence Day

  • July 4: Independence Day
  • July 18: World Listening Day
  • July 19: National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday)
  • July 23: Gorgeous Grandma Day
  • July 26: National Parents Day (fourth Sunday)
  • July 30: International Day of Friendship

July Weekly/Monthly Holidays and Observances

  • Clean Beaches Week (July 1-7)
  • National Ice Cream Month
  • National Make a Difference for Children Month
  • National Picnic Month

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

More Effective Special Education Strategies

Effective special education strategies can make a difference.

A new cadre of student teachers start their special education placements this week.  Teaching a classroom of students with a multitude of needs is difficult for the most experienced teacher.  So, for novice teachers, it can be overwhelming. But there are some effective special education strategies that student teachers can add to their toolbox to help meet the needs of their new students. However, since student needs vary widely; flexibility is key.

Check out the list of strategies to try with your students that need support with communication/language, social/emotional growth and physical /motor development. For some kids, the recipe for success may change daily.  Thank you for working so hard to help all kids shine! 

Communication and Language

  • Provide verbal prompts for vocabulary words or responses.
  • Increase complexity of words in language and content.
  • Use letters of alphabet as they come up in real life situations.
  • Allow children to demonstrate understanding in multiple ways (pointing, using visuals, communication boards or devices, own words, pointing.
  • Understand that some children may speak languages other than English (LOTE) and identify and explain patterns of spoken English.

 Social/Emotional Growth

  • Allow calming breaks for focusing (quiet area, place to move, “special helper”)
  • Provide transition sensory support (squeeze ball, sensory items, weighted blankets, seat cushions)
  • Identify and discuss feelings.
  • Support transitions (visual and verbal cues, songs)
  • Consider child’s seating.
  • Model coping feelings
  • Establish one-on-one time for teacher/student meetings.
  • Intervene as needed (resolving conflict, problem solving, making friends)
  • Adjust environment (lighting, noise, materials, soft music, distractions)

Physical/Motor Development

  • Allow extra time.
  • Enhance visual clarity or distinctiveness (special lighting)
  • Ensure accessibility and ease of handling – Talk to Physical and Occupational Therapist for ideas.
  • Provide opportunities for pincer grasp (thumb/forefinger) Gluing, small crayons, picking up small objects.
  • Allow students to explore sensory needs with sensory items (glue, paint, clay, silly putty)

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Strategies for Teaching Problem Solving Skills

Teaching kids specific strategies will help kids be better at problem solving.

Teaching kids who struggle in math is not easy.  But there are some procedures and strategies that have been shown to be helpful when learning mathematical concepts.  The following 5 strategies should be included in each math lesson.

  1. Teach each step in the sequence.
  2. Ensure that steps are taught through demonstration.
  3. Allow sufficient time for guided practice.
  4. Provide independent practice with guidance.
  5. Create a visual display and post in the classroom or student notebooks to assist students.

4 Problem Solving Strategies

Check our 4 problem solving strategies that use mnemonics to help remember them: RIDE, FAST DRAW, TINS, and STAR. I like to consider the mnemonic math strategies to be the “training wheels” of problem solving. They get your students up and solving problems, helping to build confidence until they are ready to solve the problems without mnemonics.

RIDE (Mercer, Mercer, & Pullen, 2011) RIDE is a strategy used to assist students with solving word problems. Students who have trouble with abstract reasoning, attention, memory, and/or visual spatial skills may benefit from the strategy.

R – Remember the problem correctly.

I – Identify the relevant information.

D – Determine the operations and unit for expressing the answer.

E – Enter the correct numbers, calculate, and check the answer.

FAST DRAW (Mercer & Miller, 1992) Like RIDE, FAST DRAW is another strategy used to solve word problems.

F— Find what you are solving for.

A— Ask yourself, “What are the parts of the problem?”

S— Set up the numbers.

T— Tie down the sign.

D — Discover the sign.

R — Read the problem.

A — Answer or draw and check.

W— Write the answer

TINS Strategy (Owen, 2003) The TINS strategy allows students to use different steps to analyze and solve word problems: (1) Think, (2) Information Circle, (3) Number Sentence, (4) Solution Sentence.

T—Thought Think about what you need to do to solve this problem and circle the key words.

I— Information Circle and write the information needed to solve this problem; draw a picture; cross out unneeded information.

N— Number Sentence Write a number sentence to represent the problem.

S – Solution Sentence Write a solution sentence that explains your answer.

STAR – The STAR strategy prompts students to apply a 4 -step problem-solving method: (1) Search, (2) Translate, (3) Answer, and (4) Review.

Search for important information

  • Read it aloud.
  • Highlight key words.
  • Cross out information that is not important

Translate the word problem into a number sentence.

  • Arrange counters/objects to understand the problem.
  • Draw the problem.
  • Explain the problem in your own words.

Answer the problem.

  • Consider the math operations to use.
  • Think about the steps to follow and their proper order. 

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Math Websites: Fun for Kids

Math Websites: Fun for Kids

I have found 4 great Math websites that contain varied resources that can be used to review, remediate, and enrich student learning. The resources are easy to incorporate into home packets, math centers, homework, and classroom assignments. Many of the kid-friendly websites listed below also include games that review and reinforce concepts in a fun environment. There is a variety of topics and games that will give kids hours of learning and of course, FUN!  

4 Great Math Websites to Explore

  • Fun Brain – Fun Brain math games can be searched by topic or grade level.  The games reinforce key math concepts and engage young learners. Many of the games are kid-friendly theme based.  Be sure to check out the videos which help visual learners.  For pre-K and kindergarten students the “Playground” section will provide hours of fun. I have been using Fun Brain for over 20 years. This site includes other subject areas also.
  • Hooda Math – Extensive resources that with a range of math activities from math fact practice to logic and reasoning. Site includes games that focus on higher order thinking and problem solving.  These challenges help to sharpen students’ math skills.
  • Math Game Time – Site is designed for students from pre-K through 7th grade.  The site offers educational games focused on critical math concepts.  Games are fast paced and quickly engage students.  A favorite of 3rd through 5th graders.
  • Cool Math Games – One of my favorite because it has some unique learning activities that are not seen in other websites.  The photo puzzles are great for developing spatial relations in young learners.  It also contains an extensive preview and review of precalculus and calculus in addition to both elementary and middle school games and reviews. A comprehensive website worth investigating. There is a fee if you choose to go ad-free.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Knowing Key Words Will Unlock Math Problems

Knowing Key Words Will Unlock Math Problems

Knowing key words in problem solving is critical for all students. Word problems require students to read and comprehend the question, identify what is being asked and then solve an equation.  Making it more difficult for students is that there are multiple terms that mean the same things when solving math word problems.

For early readers, ENL students or struggling readers the task can be daunting. For those kids their inability to comprehend the question may make them unable to solve the problem.  They may have math understanding but they are not able to decipher what they are being asked. Teaching them key math terminology will help them tackle math problems.

Addition

addadded toall togetherandcombined
bothhow manyin all increaseincreased
increased bymore thanjoinperimeterplus
sumtogethertotaltotal of addition

Subtraction

are notdeductdetractsubtactremove
decreased (by)differenceexceedfewerfewer than
how many morehow many leftleftleft overless
minusmore thanreduce
remaining
or remains
take away

Multiplication

areaas muchbyeachfactor
equal groupsgroups of in all lots of multiple
multiplymultiplied byperproductproduct of
ratetimestripletwice multiplied

Division

averagecut updistributedivide, divided,
divided by,
divident
split
divisoreachequal parts
equal group
evenly
separateshared equally
every halfhow many eachinto out of
per, percent,
percent (divided by 100)
quotient, quotient of quarterratio,
ratio of
same

Equal

balancedequal equivalentevengives
identicalismatchessameyields

Word problems can be tricky. Remember to look for the key words that tell you it’s the same operation.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.


Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Encourage Math Learning

Encourage Math Learning

Encouraging math learning builds a child’s confidence.

It has always bothered me to encounter people that avoid math because “math learning” was not their thing in school.  However, math in the 60’s and 70’s very often the answer was either right or wrong. Very often it was thought you either got it or you did not.  So, how could you NOT have bad feelings about math?

Today’s math teaching encourages trial and error, math explanations and problem solving.  It encourages kids to give math a try and a good math teacher has high expectations for math learning. Parents can encourage their child’s interest in math.  Check out the ideas below and watch your child’s interest and confidence grow.

9 Ways to Make Math Learning Easier

  • Expect some confusion to be part of the learning process but emphasize that effort, not ability, is what counts. Math is understandable and can be figured out.
  • Ask your child what he or she did in math class today.  Ask him or her to give details and to explain.
  • Avoid conveying negative attitudes towards math.  Never tell children not to worry about certain kinds of math because it will never be used.
  • Let kids know that occupations require a sound based in mathematics. Careers in carpentry, landscaping, medicine, pharmacy, aeronautics, and meteorology all require strong math skills.
  • Give your child meaningful problems that use numbers or shapes while you are going about everyday life.  Ask the child to explain what he or she did.
  • Spend time with kids on simple board games, puzzles, and activities that encourage better attitudes and stronger math skills.
  • Point out ways that people use math every day to pay bills, balance their checkbooks, figure out their net earnings, making change and tips at restaurants. 
  • Involve older children in projects that incorporate geometric and algebraic concepts like planting a garden, building a bookshelf, or figuring our how long it will take to drive to your family destination. 
  • Encourage children to solve problems by helping them but allow them to try to figure it out themselves.    

Children’s math achievement is shaped- and- limited by what is expected of them. It is up to us to help them be successful.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Multisensory Learning is Beneficial

All kids can benefit from multisensory instruction.

Multisensory instruction can help kids learn information more effectively because kids learn in many ways.  Some learn best with information they hear; and some when they see it.  Others when they are learning and moving; and others when they touch something. A multisensory approach means learning through more than one sensory system at the same time.  Therefore, when designing instruction, it is important to include different senses to give kids more than one way to make connections and learn concepts.

Multisensory lessons engage students on all senses at one time.  They are impactful because no matter the learning strength of each child (be it auditory, visual, tactile, or kinesthetic) it targets the learning strengths of all students at one time. It allows us to teach once and reach all our students. Therefore, all kids can benefit from multisensory instruction.

Multisensory Pathways

All learning happens through the following senses which act as pathways to the brain. These are the primary pathways to a child’s brain:

Auditory – Children who are strongly auditory learn best through the sense of hearing.  These students need to hear themselves speak what they are learning.

Visual – Children who are strongly visual learn best through the sense of sight.  These students need visuals that show the meaning of what they are learning.  

Tactile – Students who are strongly visual learn best through the sense of touch.  These students must have the opportunity to use their hands to learn.

Kinesthetic – Students who are strongly kinesthetic learn best through body movement. These students must move to focus and learn.

Are you wondering if this works?  The best answer to that question is asking “do you learn better by one of the 4 modalities”?  Most people will have at least one preference and most always can name one modality that is not their strength.  What is yours?

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Lesson Adjustments for Special Ed Students

Lesson adjustments can help students be successful

Learning to modify lessons is hard work at first. For novice or student teachers it is one of the most difficult concepts to master.  It is best to try lesson adjustments even if you are not entirely sure it is the right modification. 

As a special educator, begin designing your lesson with the General Education student in mind. Then, reflect on the things that your Special Education student would have difficulty doing in that lesson.  Once you identify those areas, then adjust your teaching to meet those needs either by modifying the work, reducing the workload, or providing supports. This design strategy can be used to modify a student’s assessment, homework, or classroom assignment. Lesson adjustment ideas include but are not limited to:

Lesson Adjustment #1: Modify the Content

  • Provide an alternate assignment that allows a student to display their talents along with the information. 
  • Give a similar but different assignment at a student’s reading or math level. 
  • Align student interest to the content.

Lesson Adjustment #2: Reduce the Workload

  • Put fewer problems on each page to lesson visual distraction
  • Reduce the number of multiple choices
  • Eliminate True or False questions – These questions can be extremely tricky because there is ALWAYS a language connection which makes it especially difficult for students with language-based disorders.
  • Give choice – Give the student ownership and motivation to choose which problems they will answer.  You give them all the questions and the number they must answer, and they choose the questions.  This helps motivate them to complete the assignment because they have ownership of their learning. their own assessment. 
  • Decrease the required essays. 
  • Select specific problems for them to answer and omit the extra problems put in as review problems.
  • Assign even or odd problems only.

Lesson Adjustment #3: Provide Supports

  • Allow extra time
  • Permit calculators
  • Brainstorm prior to the assignment
  • Provide a quieter setting for students to work 
  • Give a word bank to fill in the bank or to write an essay
  • Provide Guided Notes to help focus content into a document
  • Allow students to type or orally report their responses.
  • List steps to complete a task
  • Give specific examples
  • Highlight tricky or key words in questions
  • Have adult read assignment to student.

Remember that you will be tweaking your modifications throughout the year as your students make progress.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

ThreeRingsConnections.org November Posts

November posts can help kids learn at school & home

Each day we spend with kids is an opportunity to teach a piece of ourselves.

Happy November! Today’s health crisis has certainly put so many things in perspective! Family, health, and friends have become our priorities with deadlines existing but flexible. Over the past few months, I have seen my own grandchildren go from kids that go to school every day to kids that are either being homeschooled or learning virtually. The student teachers that I work with are not only learning how to be effective teachers in the classroom, but they are also learning how to teach remotely. They are learning the importance of their chosen career, ongoing learning, and adaptability. However, I wish they did not have to learn all those objectives in a single semester.

In many areas, my home state of New York included, parents continue to take the helm to be their child’s teachers and keep kids learning. Learning is happening but in a way that we never thought would be happening and in March we thought it would be temporary. Yes, it may not be the same as in school, but learning is happening. As parents continue their teaching challenge, I am hoping that my posts can be helpful.

So, as we move into the month of December, I hope our day-to-day teaching becomes more manageable and we continue to find learning opportunities all around us.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

November Posts

November’s Favorite Posts

My Favorite Posts

I choose my favorites each month for different reasons. Sometimes it’s timeliness, a hot education topic, student teacher needs or as a family and friends resource. Sometimes, it’s just, BECAUSE. Enjoy!

2020 Archives

2019 Archives

Take a look at a few posts coming next month
  • Lesson Adjustments for Special Ed Students
  • Multisensory Learning is Beneficial
  • Christmas Trivia for Kids & Adults

Evidence-based Learning Strategies

Evidence-based learning strategies are effective for student learning.

There are some widely used evidence-based learning strategies that are effective for many students.  Teachers that fill their toolbox with a variety of strategies will have choices when trying to reach the varied student needs in their classroom. Check out 7 strategies with acronyms that are well known for a variety of subject areas.  

STOP (Boyle & Walker Seibert, 1997) for phonemic awareness, phonics or decoding.

Stare at the unknown word
Tell yourself each letter sound
Open your mouth, say letter sounds
Put letters together to say word

SCROL (Grant, 1993) and POSSE (Englert, 2009) for reading comprehension;
Survey the headings
Connect the headings to one another
Read the text
Outline major ideas with supporting details
Look back to check the accuracy of what’s written

DRAW (C.A. Harris, Miller, & Mercer, 1995) for math calculations;
Discover the sign
Read the problem
Answer the problem or draw
Write the answer

TASSEL (Minskoff & Allsopp, 2003) for on-task behavior during class;
Try not to doodle
Arrive at class prepared
Sit near the front
Sit away from friends
End daydreaming
Look at the teacher

WATCH (Reid & Lienemann, 2006) for study skills;
Write down assignment and due date
Ask for clarification or help
Task analyze the assignment, schedule tasks over available days
Check all work for neatness, completeness, and accuracy

SPLASH(Simmonds, Luchow, Kaminsky, & Cottone, 1989) for test taking

Skim the test
Plan your strategy
Leave out tough questions
Attack questions you know
Systematically guess
House clean

Acronyms are easy to teach for teachers and easy to learn for kids. Helping children develop a strong repertoire of reliable “brain-friendly” learning strategies are effective for student learning.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

Math Learning Starts at Home

Parents can play a role in math learning.

Just as parents can help their children be ready to learn to read, they can give children a good start in math learning, too.  Developing proficiency with informal math concepts and skills are easy to do and can start before children enter school. 

Math Learning Before Children Enter School

  • Find natural opportunities to count, to sort objects, to match collections of objects, to identify shapes (while reading bedtime stories, going up stairs,  setting the table, etc.)
  • Play games such as dominoes and board games
  • Count a collection of objects and use number words to identify very small collections
  • Talk with your child about simple math problems and ideas.  (How many spoons do we need to set the table? Give me the cup with the two flowers on it.  Find the other circle on the page. Sort the blocks by shape.)

Math Learning After Children Enter School

  • Expect some confusion to be part of the learning process but emphasize that effort, not ability, is what counts. Math is understandable and can be figured out.
  • Avoid conveying negative attitudes towards math.  Never tell children not to worry about certain kinds of math because it will never be used.
  • Encourage your child to use computers for tasks like developing charts, graphs, maps, and spreadsheets. 
  • Ask your child what he or she did in math class today.  Ask him or her to give details and to explain.
  • Let kids know that occupations require a sound based in mathematics. Careers in carpentry, landscaping, medicine, pharmacy, aeronautics, and meteorology all require strong math skills.
  • Give your child meaningful problems that use numbers or shapes while you are going about everyday life.  Ask the child to explain what he or she did.
  • Spend time with kids on simple board games, puzzles, and activities that encourage better attitudes and stronger math skills. Point out ways that people use math every day to pay bills, balance their checkbooks, figure out their net earnings, making change and tips at restaurants.  Involve older children in projects that incorporate geometric and algebraic concepts like planting a garden, building a bookshelf, or figuring our how long it will take to drive to your family destination.
  • Encourage children to solve problems by providing assistance but letting them figure it out themselves.

Remember math is not just a 40 minute subject taught in school each day. Math concepts are needed for problem solving which is a lifetime skill.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

7 Websites to Support Special Education

Check out the websites filled with special education resources.

There are many special education websites that support student learning. But finding the best one can be time consuming. Check out the websites below that provide many good FREE resources to help meet the varied needs of your students.

Special Education Websites

  • National Center on Intensive Intervention

    Practical information for classroom teachers.  There are multiple resources that include strategies for reading, math, and behavior issues.  There are also instructional videos. 

  • Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports                                                         The center has extensive resources on effective school-wide disciplinary practices.

  • RTI, National Center on Response to Intervention                                                 The Center supports the implementation of RTI by disseminating information about proven and promising practices in Response to Intervention (RTI) frameworks.  

  • Reading Rockets                                                                                                                          Reading Rockets offers many strategies, lessons, and activities designed to help young children learn how to read and read better. Reading resources help struggling readers build fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension skills.

  • What Works Clearinghouse                                                                                            User-friendly practice guides for educators with research-based recommendations for schools and classrooms with an extensive list of effective interventions.  Topics include: students with learning disabilities, adolescent literacy, beginning reading, character education, dropout prevention, early childhood education, early childhood education for children with disabilities, elementary school math, English language learners, and middle school math.     

  • Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST)                                                      CAST has online tools that help educators build options and flexibility into each element of the curriculum (goals, methods, materials, and assessments).  The extensive information will help engage all students. 

  • National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials                                        This website provides information about accessible instructional materials, and how to obtain and create alternate format materials. It also has information about hardware/software resources and specific resources wih visual impairments. 

Knowing a variety of good special education resources helps to keep teachers updated on new strategies to support student learning. 

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

How Do Kids (and Adults) Learn Best?

Use best practices to help kids learn.

 How do we learn?  As I review lesson plans, I am reminded of my days teaching students in a Talented and Gifted program.  Although I was an experienced classroom teacher, it was not until I was challenged in this new role, did I truly learn how to differentiate instruction effectively, I learned to find ways to structure lessons to optimize learning, based on researched instructional strategies that made a difference in student learning. Researchers that I relied on were: Glasser, Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock. 

So, for my student teachers, check out the some VERY condensed basics in planning your lessons.

WE LEARN……

10% of what we READ

20% of what we HEAR

30% of what we SEE

50% of what we both SEE and HEAR

70% of what is DISCUSSED WITH OTHERS

80% of what we EXPERIENCE PERSONALLY

95% of what we TEACH someone else.

William Glasser

Instructional Strategies That Affect Student Achievement
CATEGORYPERCENTILE GAIN
Identifying similarities and differences, using metaphors and analogies 45
Reinforcing effort and providing recognition 34
Homework and practice 28
Nonlinguistic representations 27
Cooperative Learning 27
Setting objectives and providing feedback 23
Generating and testing hypotheses 23
Questions, cues, and advance organizers 22
Marzano, R., Pickering, D., Pollock, J., Classroom Instruction that Works, 2001

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

 

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

ThreeRingsConnections.org October Posts

October posts can help kids learn at school & home

Each day we spend with kids is an opportunity to teach a piece of ourselves.

October posts certainly seem trivial while we all live through a pandemic. It seems that I hear daily from friends, family members and readers of the many struggles they are facing in this health crisis. I am inspired by their resilience “to make it work”.

Today’s health crisis has certainly put so many things in perspective! Family, health and friends have become our priorities with deadlines existing but flexible. Over the past few months, I’ve seen my own grandchildren go from kids that go to school everyday to kids that are either being homeschooled or learning virtually. The student teachers that I work with are not only learning how to be effective teachers in the classroom, they are also learning how to teach remotely. They are learning the importance of their chosen career, ongoing learning and adaptability. However, I wish they did not have to learn all those objectives in a single semester.

In many areas, my home state of New York included, parents continue to take the helm to be their child’s teachers and keep kids learning. Learning is happening but in a way that we never thought would be happening and in March we thought it would be temporary. Yes, it may not be the same as in school, but learning is happening. As parents continue their teaching challenge, I’m hoping that my posts can be helpful.

So, as we move into the month of November, I hope our day-to-day teaching becomes more manageable and we continue to find learning opportunities all around us.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

October’s Posts

October’s Most Popular Posts

My Favorite October Posts

I choose my favorites each month for different reasons. Sometimes it’s timeliness, a hot education topic, student teacher needs or as a family and friends resource. Sometimes, it’s just, BECAUSE. Enjoy!

2020 Archives

2019 Archives

Check out some topics coming next month
  • High Leverage Practices (HLPs) for All Kids
  • US State Capitals Trivia
  • Six Strategies to Raise Student Comprehension

High Leverage Practices (HLPs) for All Kids

HLPs are the fundamentals of teaching

High Leverage Practices (HLPs) are a group of techniques developed by the Council for Exceptional Children and the CEEDAR Center. Designed originally as essential special education techniques, they are 22 techniques that all K-12 teachers should know and use across a variety of classroom contexts.

When using HLPs, teachers must consider the content they are teaching, the methodology and delivery of instruction. HLPs address four interrelated components of special education: collaboration, assessment, social/emotional/behavior practices, and instruction. 

Collaboration

HLP 1: Collaborate with professionals to increase student success.

HLP 2: Organize and facilitate effective meetings with professionals and families

HLP 3: Collaborate with families to support student learning and secure needed services.

Assessment

HLP 4: Use multiple sources of information to develop a comprehensive understanding of a student’s strengths and needs.

HLP 5: Interpret and communicate assessment information with stakeholders to collaboratively design and implement educational programs.

HLP 6: Use student assessment data analyzing instructional practices and make necessary adjustments that improve student outcomes.

Social/emotional/behavior

HLP 7: Establish a consistent, organized, and respectful learning environment.

HLP 8: Positive and constructive feedback is given to guide a students’ learning and behavior.

HLP 9: Teach social behaviors.

HLP 10: Conduct functional behavioral assessments to develop individual student behavior support plans.

Instructional

HLP 11: Identify and prioritize long- and short-term learning goals.

HLP 12: Systematically design instruction toward specific learning goals

HLP 13: Adapt curriculum tasks and materials for specific learning goals.

HLP 14: Teach cognitive and metacognitive strategies to support learning and independence.

HLP 15: Provide scaffolded supports.

HLP 16: Use explicit instruction.

HLP 17: Use flexible grouping.

HLP 18: Use strategies to promote active student engagement.

HLP 19: Use assistive and instructional technologies

HLP 20: Provide intensive instruction.

HLP 21: Teach students to maintain and generalize new learning across time and settings.

HLP 22: Provide positive and constructive feedback to guide students’ learning and behavior.

I believe HLPs are the fundamentals of teaching.  They are high leverage: not only because they matter to student learning but because they are basic for advanced skill in teaching. With expectations for student performance increasing over the years, it seems only common sense that (HLPs) can be effective for ALL students.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Great Resources for High Leverage Practices

Other posts related to this topic:

ThreeRingsConnections.org September Posts

September posts can help kids learn at school & home

Each day we spend with kids is an opportunity to teach a piece of ourselves.

September posts certainly seem trivial while we all live through a pandemic. It seems that I hear daily from friends, family members and readers of the many struggles they are facing in this health crisis. I am inspired by their resilience “to make it work”.

Today’s health crisis has certainly put so many things in perspective! Family, health and friends have become our priorities with deadlines existing but flexible. Over the past few months, I’ve seen my own grandchildren go from kids that go to school everyday to kids that are either being homeschooled or learning virtually. The student teachers that I work with are not only learning how to be effective teachers in the classroom, they are also learning how to teach remotely. They are learning the importance of their chosen career, ongoing learning and adaptability. However, I wish they did not have to learn all those objectives in a single semester.

In many areas, my home state of New York included, parents continue to take the helm to be their child’s teachers and keep kids learning. Learning is happening but in a way that we never thought would be happening and in March we thought it would be temporary. Yes, it may not be the same as in school, but learning is happening. As parents continue their teaching challenge, I’m hoping that my posts can be helpful.

So, as we move into the month of October, I hope our day-to-day teaching becomes more manageable and we continue to find learning opportunities all around us.

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

September Posts

September’s Most Popular Posts

My Favorite September Posts

I choose my favorites each month for different reasons. Sometimes it’s timeliness, a hot education topic, student teacher needs or as a family and friends resource. Sometimes, it’s just, BECAUSE. Enjoy!

2020 Archives

2019 Archives

Check out some topics coming next month
  • Brain Breaks in Learning
  • US State Flags Trivia: Part II
  • Stories with Holes
  • Fifth Grade Standards for Learning
  • Learning Games and Websites & Apps
  • Academic Vocabulary Grades 1,2, and 5

November Learning Activities

November learning activities gives relevance to historical dates.

For kids in school, knowing historical dates helps them relate to history and builds their general knowledge. Knowing these dates can help parents and teachers engage students in valuable learning activities. Check out November  learning activities.

November 2020

3 Election Day (US) – Do a voting activity

9 The first giant panda was collected alive in China in 1927. – Look at the giant pandas through the live cam at the National Zoo in Washington, DC.

11 Veterans Day (US) – Write a letter to a veteran to thank them for their service.

12 Elizabeth Cady Stanton born (woman’s rights advocate)1815 – Read a story about Stanton and talk about women voting

13 World Kindness Day – Write about an act of kindness or do an act of kindness.

15 America Recycles Day – Create an art piece out of recycled materials

18 Four standard time zones for the continental USA were introduced, 1883. -Research what they are and find them on a US map.

20 Universal Children’s Day – Draw a picture of what you think you will be doing in 2040

26 Thanksgiving (US) (4th Thursday in November) – Make some Thanksgiving placemats

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

NYS Museum: Online Resources

NYS Museum is now ONLINE. Visit and Learn

The NYS Museum has launched the Portal to Online Educational Resources & Activities that brings together many of the museum’s resources.  Check out the links to the popular virtual “filed trips,” digital collections, online resources, and many fun activities for kids.   The Portal provides opportunities for educators, caregivers, and students looking for engaging and educational activities to do at home.

The portal resources and activities will be updated often.  Also included on the site is NYS Learning Standards supporting online lessons and content-created publications.  Virtual activities are coming soon!  Check it Out!

NYS Museum Resources

  • 360 Degree Virtual Field Trips
  • Regents Room of the State Education Building
  • The Replica Liberty BellThe Rotunda Murals
  • Teacher Guides & Activities for Students
  • NYSM Women of Science Programming
  • Women’s Suffrage Resources
  • Fun Activities
  • NYSM Videos
  • The Rotunda at NYSED

Brain Breaks Help Everyone

Brain Breaks are effective in learning.

We all know that we sometimes need just a few minutes to take a short break to help us get focused.  Sometimes, it is for a cup of coffee, a cookie or to check our phones.  It helps us catch our breath and gives us another opportunity to start again. Did you know that your breaks are call Brain Breaks? 

Smart teachers know that kids need short breaks in learning.  Sometimes, called Brain Breaks, they are short, physical activities that are interspersed with periods of focused academic work.  Research shows that shorter blocks of instruction are more effective for many kids, with younger kids maxing out after about 10 minutes and older kids lasting up to a half-hour or more. Adding short breaks can help improve students’ attention, retention of information, creativity, and efficiency.  Adding some breaks can be fun, make them a definite MUST in every classroom.

6 Benefits of Brain Breaks

  1. Improves focus by lessening frustration and boredom
  2. Provides physical activity
  3. Adds some fun into learning
  4. Gives a sense of accomplishment by completing an assignment
  5. Helps use up extra energy
  6. Give kids (and adults) something to look forward to

Brain Breaks and Remote Learning

Now that many schools have started remote learning once again, there is even more reason to give kids some much needed breaks from computer screens.  Since kids are missing the physical activity of a classroom, Brain Breaks are must.  Think simple.  Try jumping jacks, stretches, yoga poses or jogging in place for a short quick break.  If you want to extend your break a few more minutes add a dance party, take a short walk, play a boardgame or do a household chore.

Although short breaks during classwork or homework are beneficial be sure to plan carefully. Be sure your breaks are not too much fun or too lengthy or you might have kids not want to get back to work!

The length of Brain Breaks and the topics depends on your child’s age and interest levels.  So, choose things that YOUR child wants to do as a Brain Break.  Create a list of ideas so that you or your child can choose their own Brain Break.  Do not be afraid to let your child add to the list (of course with parent approved)

Remote learning is creating many challenges for parents, teachers, and students.  Why not add some Brain Breaks into your schedule to make learning easier and less stressful? Teach your child that you too, need Brain Breaks.  Show them that being able to drink a HOT cup of coffee is what makes you happy.  Enjoy your Brain Break!

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education All about reaching the kids in the classroom and at home?

Other posts related to this topic:

  • Lesson Fillers in the Classroom
  • Lesson Filler Activities