Math Milestones in Grades K-2

Math milestones in grades K-2
Math milestones in Grades K-2

Kids start learning math the moment they start exploring the world.  Kids develop their math skills at different rates, but there are some math milestones in grades K-2 that most kids hit ROUGHLY in those grades. Each skill—from identifying shapes to counting to finding patterns—builds on what kids already know.

Kindergartners (Age 5 years)

  • Begin to understand basic time concepts, like morning or days of the week
  • Add by counting the fingers on one hand—1, 2, 3, 4, 5—and starting with 6 on the second hand
  • Identify the larger of two numbers and recognize numerals up to 20
  • Understand the meaning of words like unlikely or possible
  • Copy or draw symmetrical shapes
  • Start using very basic maps to find a “hidden treasure”
  • Follow multi-step directions that use words like first and next

First and Second Graders

  • Know the difference between two- and three-dimensional shapes and name the basic ones (cubes, cones, cylinders)
  • Count to 100 by ones, twos, fives, and tens
  • Do basic addition and subtraction up to 20
  • Read and create a simple bar graph
  • Predict what comes next in a pattern and create own patterns
  • Recognize and know the value of coins
  • Write and recognize the numerals 0 to 100, and the words for numbers from one to twenty

Don’t forget that THESE ARE BALLPARK AGES. Don’t worry if your child does not yet have all the skills listed for their age group.  Every child is different and progress at their own rate.  Your child is on a lifelong learning journey with many stops along the way.  Enjoy the journey and see where they have been and where they are going.

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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Math Milestones for Preschoolers

Math milestones are generally reached ABOUT the same age.
Math milestones are generally reached ABOUT the same age.

Kids start learning math the moment they start exploring the world.  Whether it is shapes, counting or finding patterns, little ones are constantly building on what they already know and hitting some major math milestones.  

Kids develop their math skills at different rates, but there are some math milestones most kids hit around ROUGHLY the same age.   Each skill—from identifying shapes to counting to finding patterns—builds on what kids already know.

Babies (0-12 months)

  • Start to understand relative size (baby is small, parents are big)
  • Begin to understand words that describe quantities (more, bigger, enough)
  • Begin to predict the sequence of events (like setting the table means dinner is coming soon)
  • Start to understand basic cause and effect (tickling makes you laugh)
  • Begin to classify things in simple ways (play with toys, eat food)

Toddlers (Ages 1-2 years)

  • Match basic shapes (triangle to triangle, circle to circle)
  • Explore measurement by filling and emptying containers
  • Begin reciting numbers, but may skip some of them
  • Understand that numbers mean “how many” (using fingers to show how many years old they are) 
  • Start seeing patterns in daily routines and in things like floor tiles
  • Understand words that compare or measure things (under, behind, faster)

Preschoolers (Ages 3-4 years)

  • Start predicting cause and effect (what will happen to the ground when it rains)
  • Uses spatial awareness to put puzzles together.
  • Recognized shapes in the real world
  • Start sorting things by shape, color, size, or purpose.
  • Compare and contrast using classifications like size, gender, height
  • Count to at least 20 and accurately point to and count items in a group.
  • Understand that numerals stand for number names (3 stands for three)

Don’t forget that THESE ARE BALLPARK AGES. Don’t worry if your child does not yet have all the skills listed for their age group.  Every child is different and progress at their own rate.  Your child is on a lifelong learning journey with many stops along the way.  Enjoy the journey and see where they have been and where they are going.

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

Other posts related to this topic:

Math Enrichment Problems for Grades 2-3: May

To strengthen thinking skills challenge kids with math enrichment problems.
To strengthen thinking skills challenge kids with math enrichment problems.

Math Enrichment activities should teach kids to solve problems using strategies that promote thinking. These activities are perfect for those kids that need math problems that go beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  Try some of the problems this month to challenge their thinking.

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)

Math Enrichment Problems:

  1. It takes GPA 13 hours and to get to Myrtle Beach from his house.  The distance of the trip is 700 miles.  What was the average speed he traveled on the trip? 
  2. What is the value of 2 Ferris Wheels, if you add them together and get 128?
  3.  If 9 X D = 54, what is the value of D?
  4. If 12 + DG = 74, How much is DG + DG? 
  5. Abby woke up at 7:02am on Thursday and went to be at 8:11pm.  If she napped for 1 hour, how long was she awake on Thursday?
  6. Six tomatoes cost $7.06.  Eleven apples cost as much as 4 tomatoes.      What is the cost of 7 apples? 

Answers:

  1. 53.85 miles per hour (MPH) 700 miles divided by 13 hours = 53.85 miles per hour.
  2. 24.  Since the total of 2 Ferris Wheels = 228, they each are an equal amount of 124.
  3. D = 6
  4. 124. Since DG = 62 therefore, 62 + 62 = 124.
  5. 12 hours and 9 minutes.
  6. 7 apples = $3.01
    • $7.06 divided by 6  = $ 1.18 for each tomato
    • 4 X $1.18 (each tomato) is a total of $4.72
    • So, 11 apples = $4.72
    • So, 1 apple = 43 cents. ($4.72 divided by 11)
    • So, the total cost of 7 apples $3.01 (7 X 43 cents)
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Creative Thinking Tools

Creative thinking tools enable kids to think creatively.
Creative thinking tools enable kids to think creatively.

When I was a teacher in the TAG (Talented and Gifted) program I had to administer a creativity test to all 3rd grade students in the district as part of admission into program.  That test, along with achievement and cognitive tests, were equal components in the program admission.

I loved administering the creativity test and so did the kids!  The test asked students to draw a series of pictures using only partial shapes; adding details and identifying what they drew.  Every year, there were always a few students who asked if they could do the test again.  They just knew they could do it better!  This realization showed us that teaching kids to think creatively was not only important for learning but could also be fun. Working with classroom teachers, my partner and I created lessons and programs that allowed students to be creative.

We started by teaching kids the tools needed to be creative thinkers. Creative thinking builds on the concept that a single question can have multiple answers. It doesn’t focus on right or wrong answers but on the importance of giving students the opportunity to express their ideas. This idea was especially liberating for our student with special needs, quiet, anxious and ELL students.  Being allowed to give non-ordinary responses, especially in a group activity, allows ALL students to participate.

How to Teach Creative Thinking

Once the TAG admission tests were completed, we used a similar Creativity activity to show kids the “tricks” or “creative thinking tools” to be creative.  We taught them 5 creative thinking tools; the SAME 5 components of good writing: fluency, flexibility, originality, elaboration and evaluation.  

  • Fluency – Being able to think of lots of responses to a single question or response.
  • Flexibility – Being able to shift thinking from one way of thinking to another. 
  • Originality – Trying to come up with answers that are clever and unique.
  • Elaboration – Adding details to a basic idea to make it more interesting and complete.
  • Evaluation –Teaching kids how to weigh alternative ideas.  This was especially important when kids were working on team projects.   

Once the kids understood the basic components of creative thinking the LEARNING really began. 

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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Math Enrichment Problems for Primary: April

To strengthen thinking skills challenge kids with math enrichment problems.

To strengthen thinking skills challenge kids with math enrichment problems.

Math Enrichment activities should teach kids to solve problems using strategies that promote thinking. These activities are perfect for those kids that need math problems that go beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  Try some of the problems this month to challenge their thinking.

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)

Math Enrichment Problems:

  1. 8 adults, 6 children and 4 dogs went to a concert.  Tickets cost $7 for adults, $5 for children and $3 for dogs.  What was the cost for everyone to go to the concert?
  2. Abby went on a picnic with her sisters.  She bought 7 apples for $1.25 each, 7 sandwiches for $3.75 each, and 7 desserts for $1.95 each.  How much did Abby spend on the picnic?
  3. Meghan bought 12 boxes of donuts that each had 12 donuts.  How many donuts did Meghan buy?
  4. Emmy bought 12 mice for $1.02 each.  How much did Emmy spend on mice?
  5. Teagan earned $2 helping her mom fold the laundry.  If she earned $2 every day, how much would she earn in a year.  (HINT: There are 365 days in a year)
  6. If 12 people each weigh 100 pounds.  What is there total weight?

Answers:

  • $98.00
  • $48.65
  • 144 donuts
  • $12.24 total
  • $730.00
  • 1200 pounds

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Early Childhood Great Websites

Great resources for early childhood teachers
Great resources for early childhood teachers

When working with Early Childhood Student Teachers I often hear that they are spending lots of time looking online for resources.  There is SO MUCH OUT THERE, I certainly can see how that happens! My suggestion for them is to start with just 2 “Tried and True” sites and explore them thoroughly.  The two that I suggest are The National Association for the Education of Young Children and Family Education. They are extensive and are updated regularly.

I also suggest that they open a Word Doc and write a few notes about their favorite websites including notes and the dates that you researched it. This helps to organize past research and topic areas. Yes, you can BOOKMARK it too, but you’ll soon learn that many of the site names sound alike! 

  • National Association for the Education of Young Children Expand your knowledge and skills and find classroom activities quickly with these great resources from NAEYC.  Check out the quick list of resources for new and classic resource.
  • Family Education Great articles, activity ideas, internet tips for teachers (including special needs) can be found at this site. Good parenting articles also.

Once you tackle these two, start to explore some of the other resources from earlier posts.   Happy Researching!

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Enrichment Math Primary: March

Math Thinking Skills can be learned by trying math enrichment problems.
Math Thinking Skills can be learned by trying math enrichment problems.

Math Enrichment activities should teach kids to solve problems using strategies that promote thinking. These activities are perfect for those kids that need math problems that go beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  Try some of the problems this month to challenge their thinking.

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)

Math Enrichment: Count Them Up

  1. If 50 cookies need 5 eggs, how many eggs would you need to make 150 cookies?
  2. If you want to triple a recipe that calls for 9 apples, how many apples would you need?
  3. If a 15-pound chicken will feed 30 people, how many people well a 5-pound chicken feed?
  4. If a recipe that makes 90 cookies calls for 6 cups of oats, how many cups of oats would you use for 30 cookies.
  5. A 10-pound cake uses 3 cups of sugar.  How many cups of sugar would a 5-pound cake use?
  6. If a pound of spaghetti will feed 4 people, how many people will 2 and ½ pounds feed.

Answers

  1. 15 eggs
  2. 27 apples
  3. 10 people
  4. 2 cups of oats
  5. 1 and ½ cups of sugar
  6. 10 people
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Understood.org: Resources for Coronavirus

Understood.org: Resources for Coronavirus
Understood.org: Excellent resources for Coronavirus

I don’t usually just post one link that I think is terrific, but understood.org has posted some great information to support learning during the COVID-19 crisis. We certainly need some good information in these difficult times.

The website Understood.org is a website that I’ve used for years to support the needs of students that learn and think differently. However, I think there postings on Coronavirus are very well done and certainly continue to fit their mission of helping us to learn and think differently. I’ve added some links below, however, there are additional links on the site. I think it’s certainly worth a look by my blog followers.

Coronavirus: Latest Updates and Tips

Hope you find the information helpful. I am working on reposting learning activities and new activities to support learning. Keep checking threeringsconnections.org

Stay well Friends!

Donna

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COVID-19 Learning Activities Math Newsletter

  COVID-19 learning activities
COVID-19 Learning Activities

COVID-19 LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Who would think that I would ever be posting a COVID-19 Learning activities newsletter? However, here we are with schools closed and millions of kids home. Parents are stepping up to “homeschool” their children and are using home packets and online resources. For many this is unfamiliar territory and an added element to their already full plates.

Many parents are scouring the internet to find school activities to support schoolwork or looking for additional activities. To help shorten your search I’m working on some mid-month newsletters of some past posts from my blog threeringsconnections.org to get you started. This newsletter is focused on Math activities. Keep checking back for additional posts.

Math Resources

Learning occurs in day to day activities. So, look for and create learning opportunities throughout your day. Stay safe and be well.

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

Rubrics for Kids and Teachers

Rubrics help kids understand what constitutes mastery of a skill.
Rubrics help kids understand what constitutes mastery of a skill.

A rubric is a set of guidelines for measuring progress towards a standard or objective.  Using one helps students and teachers share the same understanding of how progress will be measured and what constitutes mastery of that skill or goal.  Unlike letter grades, rubrics allow you to measure a child’s progress by identifying skills mastered and which ones need additional work. They can be written as a number, a checklist, or a narrative.

Rubrics can be developed by individual teachers, school or districts but the most powerful ones are developed WITH students.  Children sometimes have a tough time understanding what a “good job” means in a classroom. Often, it’s said without clarity and sometimes it looks different for different kids. Also “good job” can vary from teacher to teacher or time of the day. So, as teachers, we have to be sure that we are using language that kids understand and that understand the skills they have to achieve.  Once rubric language is taught to kids, teachers have to consistently use them to improve student learning.  

I used to explain to students the reason for using rubrics by using this example. When your parent tells you to clean your room, you do it, they check it and they think you did not do a good job. Kids immediately saw the need for a rubric.  They had experienced the difference between “mom’s clean and kid clean”.

Rubrics give details into a rating and can be created for all kinds of things!  What’s important is that kids and adults need to understand what they need to do at each level so they understand how they are doing.    

5 Resources

Next Month: Rubrics in Teacher Evaluations

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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ThreeRingsConnections.org Newsletter: February Posts

February Posts from ThreeRingsConnections.org
February Posts from ThreeRingsConnections.org

Each day we spend with kids is an opportunity to teach a piece of ourselves.

Last year my 2019 Blog resolution was to be sure that I posted a newsletter on time each month. Resolution Success! This year I weighed whether to continue the blog or to spend the majority of my time with a larger writing project. After much deliberation and support from family and blog followers, I’ve decided to continue blogging for another year. So, my 2020 Blog resolution is to continue writing the Threeringsconnections blog AND still getting the newsletter out on time each month. Let the balancing of efforts begin! 2 newsletters down and 10 to go. As for other “writing”… woohoo! 2 grants written. Awards in May. Fingers crossed! Batting 500%

February Posts

February’s Most Popular Posts

My Favorite February Posts

I choose my favorites each month for different reasons. Sometimes it’s timeliness, a hot education topic, student teacher needs or as a family and friends resource. Sometimes, it’s just, BECAUSE. Enjoy!

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

2020 Archives

2019 Archives

2018 Archives

Check out some topics coming next month
  • KidCitizen: Great History Resource
  • March Prompts to Get Students Writing
  • Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day

Math Enrichment Primary: February

Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems
Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems

Math Enrichment activities should teach kids to solve problems using strategies that promote thinking. These activities are perfect for those kids that need math problems that go beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  Try some of the problems this month to challenge their thinking.

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)

Math Enrichment: Count Them Up

  1. 2 farmers each have 2 barrels. In each barrel are 3 cats who each have 2 kittens. How many legs are there? (HINT: Don’t forget the farmer’s legs)
  2. Connall collected a dozen eggs from 4 chickens.  How many eggs did Connall collect?
  3. Declan collected 5 dozen eggs but on the way to the house he dropped 9 eggs.  How many eggs did he give to his mother?
  4. Old Macdonald had a farm, and on that farm he had 2 cows, 2 pigs, a horse and cat.  How many heads were on the farm?  How many shoulders? How many eyes? (HINT: Don’t forget to include Old Macdonald)
  5. The Smith parents and their 3 kids, 1 cat and 1 dog went for a walk.  How many legs were walking? 
  6. A spider in a box had 100 babies.  How many legs are there in the box? (HINT: Don’t forget Mommy Spider)

Answers:

  1. 30 legs
  2. 48 eggs
  3. 51 eggs
  4. 7 heads, 14 shoulders, 14 eyes
  5. 18 legs
  6. 808 legs
Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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ThreeRingsConnections’ Newsletter: December 2019

Each day we spend with kids is an opportunity to teach a piece of ourselves.

Happy New Year Friends! Welcome 2020!

Yeah! I achieved my 2019 Blog resolution to get the Threeringsconnections’ newsletter posted each month on time! I wasn’t sure if I could do it. However, the many followers and comments that I received throughout the year, motivated me to GET IT DONE! Let’s go 2020!

I hope you have a year filled with your hopes and dreams!

December 2019

December’s Most Popular Posts

My Favorite December Posts

I choose my favorites each month for different reasons. Sometimes it’s timeliness, a hot education topic, student teacher needs or as a family and friends resource. Sometimes, it’s just, BECAUSE. Enjoy!

2019 Archives

2018 Archives

  • Gradual Release of Responsibility
  • Kindness Quotes to Start the New Year
  • Math Thinking Skills Primary
  • Math Thinking Skills Grades 4-5

Math Thinking Skills Primary: December

Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems.
Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems

Some students in the Primary Grades need additional math activities that goes beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  This month we’ll look at some problem solving involving counting body parts.  (really, we’re looking at early multiplication which is repeated addition)

Math Thinking Skills:

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)
Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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Scholastic Books Warehouse Sale

Scholastic Books Warehouse Sales are great opportunities to buy books at bargain prices.
Scholastic Books at deep discounts

Scholastic Books Warehouse Sale 2019 is Coming!

December 4th – 14th 

My local friends the closest location is Danbury, Ct.  (Approximately 40 mins. from Fishkill area.

Scholastic Books Warehouse offers for a limited a limited time only deep discounts on books.  This holiday you can purchase “Buy One, Get One Box” from hundreds of books, gifts,  and school supplies. There is even a Build a Box opportunity!  Refresh your school, home, and classroom libraries, and stock up on gifts for everyone.

For every item you buy, choose an item of equal or lesser value for FREE

  • Shop from a large assortment of already reduced items
  • No limits on how many items you can buy
  • Build-a-Box is included with the BOGO offer (yes, Danbury has it)
  • Perfect way to maximize school purchase orders, grants, and Title 1 funds

Coupon is $10.00 off a purchase of $100.00. OR $25.00 off a purchase of $100.00 using Scholastic Dollars.

Danbury, CT Warehouse Sale:

Weekday Hours: 10:00 am – 8:00 pm
Saturday Hours: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Closed Sundays

The Danbury location is a Build-a-Box event. As many books as you can fit in a box for less than $29.95.

Sign up and get coupon! Enjoy!

Math Thinking Skills: Primary – November

Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems.
Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems.

Some students in the Primary Grades need additional math activities that goes beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  This month we’ll look at some problem solving involving counting body parts.  (really, we’re looking at early multiplication which is repeated addition)

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)

Math Thinking Skills: What Comes Next?

Question One: 3, 6, 9, ___, ___. ___ What numbers go on the lines?

Question Two: 8,10,12, ____, ____, ____ What numbers go on the lines?

Question Three: Declan started his trip to Poughkeepsie on Sunday with spending money of $20.00. Each day of his vacation he spent $3.00.  On Thursday morning, he boarded the train to go back to NYC.  He had not spent any money that morning.  How much money does he have remaining from his original $20.00? Since he had not spent any money on Thursday, how much money does he have left?

Question Four: 2, 5, 9, 14, ____, ____, ____.  What numbers go on the lines?

Question Five: 5, 50, 500, 5000, 50000 ____ What is the next number in this sequence? 

MATH THINKING ANSWERS

Question One: 12, 15, 18, Counting by 3’s starting at 12.

Question Two:  14, 16 18.  Counting by 2’s starting at 8.

Question Three: $8.00 remaining.  He spent $3.00 on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday for a total spent of $12.00. 

Question Four: 20, 27, 35 The difference between each number on the line increases by 1, starting with a difference of 3 between 2 and 5.

Question Five: Each number is multiplied by 10. Look carefully and you’ll see that each number adds another 0. 

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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ThreeRingsConnections’ Newsletter: October 2019

Thinking is the hardest work any one can do –
Henry Ford

Ten months down in 2019, how are you doing on those New Years Resolutions? If you are still working on catching up on professional development, take a look at this month’s newsletter. All 12 October posts are below, as well as ALL the posts since I started the blog in September 2018. My New Year’s Resolution to get the Threeringsconnections’ newsletter out on a timely, consistent schedule is accomplished: 10 down and 2 more to go! Have a great month!

2018 Archives

October’s Most Popular Posts

As regular readers know, at the end of each month I share the three most popular posts from the last month. I thought people might find it interesting to see what everyone else was looking at. Enjoy!

My Favorite October Posts

I choose my favorites each month for different reasons. Sometimes it’s timeliness, a hot education topic, student teacher needs or as a family and friends resource. Sometimes, it’s just, BECAUSE. Enjoy!

  • Concepts of Print (COP)in Daily Reading
  • Teacher Motivational Quotes
  • How to Help Highly Advanced Readers
Coming Next Month
  • Online Safety: Free Classroom Resources
  • Math Thinking Skills: Primary – November
  • Scientist of the Month- Benjamin Franklin

Math Thinking Skills Primary: October

Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems.
Math Thinking Skills can be strengthened when solving problems.

Some students in the Primary Grades need additional math activities that goes beyond calculation skills.  For those kids we need to nurture a love of math while challenging them to deepen their mathematical understanding and thinking skills.  This month we’ll look at some problem solving involving counting body parts.  (good practice in repeated addition which is…… multiplication). 

Don’t forget to use 1 of your 6 problem solving strategies

  • Draw a picture
  • Guess and Check
  • Use a table or list
  • Find a pattern
  • Logical reasoning
  • Draw a picture Working backwards (try a simpler version first)

Math Thinking Skills: Count Them Up

  1. Abby went to see the animals on a farm in Wappingers Falls. She saw 20 chickens.  How many chicken heads did she see?  How many legs do the chickens have all together?
  2. Teagan went to the Bronx Zoo.  She saw a tree with 9 monkeys.  How many fingers did the monkeys have all together?
  3. Connall has a dog and a cat.  If the dog and cat wore animal shoes, how many shoes would Connall have to buy?   
  4. In Emily’s family there are 3 children and 2 adults.  How many heads do they have all together? How many legs do they have all together? How many fingers do they have all together?  How many eyes do they have all together?
  5. Meghan loves spiders.  She saw 4 spiders in GG’s garage.  How many legs do the spiders have in all? HINT: You must know how many legs spiders have.
  6. Lowyn saw 5 Ladybugs on the peonies in GG’s yard.  When she counted all the legs on the Ladybugs, how many legs did she count?  HINT: You must know how many legs ALL INSECTS HAVE.
  7. The spiders were planning to have a dance party.  It was going to be a big party and they were only going to allow 102 spiders to attend.  IF all the spiders went to the party, how many dance shoes will they have to order?  If the dance shoes only come as a pair, how many pairs of shoes will they have to order for all 102 spiders to have dance shoes?

ANSWERS

  1. 20 heads and 40 legs
  2. 90 fingers because each of the 9 monkeys have 10 fingers.
  3. 8 shoes (4 for the dog and 4 for the cat)
  4. 5 heads, 10 legs, 50 fingers, 10 eyes
  5. Spiders have 8 legs.  4 spiders = 8+8+8+8 = 32 legs
  6. Ladybugs are Insects and insects have 6 legs.  6+6+6+6+6= 30 legs
  7. Spiders have 8 legs.  102 spiders = 102+102+102+102+102+102+102+102=816 legs OR 408 pairs of shoes Each spider would get 4 pairs of shoes for their feet. 
Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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Exit Slip (Ticket) Ideas

An Exit Slip (ticket) can be used at all grade levels and every subject.
An Exit Slip (ticket) can be used at all grade levels and every subject.

An Exit Slip (Ticket) is a formative assessment tool used to assess student learning and to plan future lessons. Typically, a prompt or a question, it is given to students at the end of a class that is tied to the objective of the lesson taught that day. They can be in a multiple-choice format or an open response. These mini assessments are meant to be no more than 1-5 minutes and not graded.

5 Exit Ticket Ideas

  • 3-2-1 Tickets
    • 3 things I learned today
    • 2 things I found interesting
    • 1 question I still have
  • And the Survey Says…
    • Use the Exit Slip to survey a class on a topic. It can be used to launch a new topic or build class culture.
  • Activate Prior Knowledge
    • What do you know about _______?
  • All About You
    • What is your favorite __________?   This helps to build a shared community.
  • Give me a number?
    • Simply asking students to self-assess their learning.  This could be as easy as #3 – I get it, #2- I don’t totally understand it or #3 – I don’t get it and I need some help.

Exit Slip Prompts

Some basic prompts can be used for many different types of lessons.  Having a collection of prompts at your fingertips will ensure that you are engaging student voice in every lesson.  For plan book ease, number your prompts and just add the number to your plan book.  Try some of the basic prompts below and modify as needed. 

  • Did you enjoy working with your group today? Explain why?
  • Write one positive and one negative thing about working with your group today?
  • Did you enjoy working with your partner today? Explain why?
  • Name 1 thing that you learned in today’s lesson that you didn’t know?
  • From today’s lesson, what question would you like to see on the next test?
  • What was the main idea of today’s lesson?  Can you write one sentence about it?
  • I didn’t understand ________ in the lesson today.
  • What was the 1 thing that you learned in today’s lesson that you didn’t know?
  • What was the 1 thing that you learned in today’s lesson that made you go “WOW”?
  • I would like to learn more about….

THINK of Exit Slips as giving you the answer to 2 Big Mysteries. How YOU (the teacher) taught the lesson and where are you going next in the curriculum. Why wait until the “official” test results are in to know how kids scored and how we did? 

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

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  • Exit Tickets (Slips) in the Classroom?

Exit Tickets (Slips) in the Classroom?

Exit Tickets are a quick and easy student assessment
Exit Tickets are a quick and easy student assessment

Recently while observing student teacher lessons I realized that each of them used Exit Tickets as their closure activity. Although they each teach different grades and subjects, they all used Exit Tickets as the “go-to” strategy to check for understanding. And it worked! 

What are Exit Tickets (slips)

An exit ticket is a formative assessment tool used to assess student learning and to plan future lessons. Typically, a prompt or a question, it is given to students at the end of a class that is tied to the objective of the lesson taught that day. They are usually in a multiple-choice format or an open response. These mini assessments are meant to be no more than 1-5 minutes and not graded.

10 Exit Ticket Benefits

  • Allows students to self-assess
  • Clarifies main concept of the lesson
  • Keeps students engaged in the lesson
  • Assesses student understanding
  • Creates an additional review and reinforcement opportunity
  • Invites students to ask questions or clarify thoughts
  • Guides teacher lesson design based on student understanding
  • Helps organize small group instruction
  • Provides data on student progress.
  • Opens a communication channel between teacher and student

Exit slips are easy to use for teachers and students.  They can be used at every grade level. So, why not give them a try?

Great article on Exit Slips by education expert Robert Marzano. Check it out. 

Isn’t education ALL about reaching the kids?

Other posts related to this topic: